Chorizo Made Me Do It.

Confession: I ate terribly today. Actually, I’ve eaten terribly this week. Healthy habits will ebb and flow. The key to optimal health is your resiliency from the slippage. In other words, making poor nutritional decisions once in a while doesn’t destroy our health; continuously making poor nutritional decisions does.

my top two strategies for getting my shit together after a nutritional nightmare of a few days.png

Here’s my raw, honest food diary for today. Drumroll please…I had a 16 ounce latte (half the syrup, thanks) for breakfast in lieu of healthy, chewable, real food; then for lunch I had a gut-bomb of a chorizo-egg-cheese burrito at our local authentic Mexican dive. I know, it sucks. I let emo-eating get the best of me. I chose my fav comfort foods thinking they would cheer up a sucky couple days. However, unsurprisingly, I ended up feeling worse. Why do we do that? Why do we consume things that make us feel so physically/mentally unwell? Well, we seem to mind-dump these feelings in between our gut-ache and the next time we make the same. exact. choices.

I’ll now share with you my top two strategies for getting my shit together after a nutritional nightmare of a few days.

First, it is the recovery that matters. Often when we go rogue in terms of food choices, we have a tendency to be “all or none” about it. We tend to think “well, the day is shot; might as well keep it [making bad choices] going.” Wrong. It’s never too late to recover the day to some extent. After eating that huge burrito for lunch, I honestly felt like I could go the next 2 weeks without eating. What a cinder block of food in my gut. Blah! But, I had a beautiful kale/Brussels sprouts/cabbage/pumpkin seed/craisin/sunflower seed salad for dinner. I don’t want to be all dramatic about it, but I already feel better and that was an hour ago. It’s not about trying to “detox” the day (that’s not how it works), but rather hitting the reset button and jamming some much-needed nutrients into my veins.

Second, it’s forcing yourself to lock this memory into your rolodex (do kids these days even know what a rolodex is??) so you can make better future decisions. In other words, really sit and take a quality assessment on exactly how you feel. For me, I have a raging headache (something in chorizo really gets to my skull), and I feel bloated and super tired. I knew that was going to happen today, but forged ahead with poor decisions anyway because I’m a flawed human. However, more often than not, I have success practicing what I call the “10-second rule.” The 10-second rule entails forcing yourself to truly think about the food or beverage you’re about to consume before you consume it. Think about how you are going to feel after you have it. Think about how it either helps or harms the progress you hope to make with improving your health, losing weight, etc. Really, really, think about it hard for at least 10 seconds before making a choice. You might just find that it increases the success rate on passing up the junk.

You’re a human. So am I. We are inherently flawed, and we’re programmed to do what feels good rather than what’s always the right thing to do. Practicing quick recovery and the 10-second rule can strengthen your resiliency muscle and gradually improve your habit reconstruction. It is a journey that doesn’t have a clear destination. Embrace that. Try harder, don’t get too down when you get off track (like I did). Get to it.

xoxo – Casey

Ps – Have you read my book yet? Check it out here!

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